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Find publications about alternative transportation, including alternative fuels, advanced vehicles, and regulated fleets.

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Alternative Fuel News, Volume 5 Issue 2 7/1/2001 Newsletters

National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO

This issue of the Alternative Fuel News features articles on the National Energy Policy; the 2001 National Clean Cities Conference including Coalition Award and Partner Award recipients; station cars; and new emissions-reducing incentives in Texas.

Clean Fuels Paving the Way for America's Future: A Source for Information on Clean Burning Alternative Transportation Fuels 4/1/1995 Brochures & Fact Sheets

U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC

With so many alternative fuels being promoted by various groups, it is important for legislators, the public and all interested parties to understand the different fuels that are available, how they are made, how they are used and their impact on the environment. This brochure is intended to help legislators at all levels to make informed decisions and for the media, with a responsibility of informing the public, to be educated on these issues. The fuels covered in this brochure include: ethanol, ethyl tertiary butyl ether, methanol, methyl tertiary butyl ether, biodiesel, gasoline additives and combustion modifiers, electric vehicles, natural gas and propane. It also summarizes regional and state clean fuel policies and regulations.

Fuel Economy Test Procedures Alternative-Fueled Automobile CAFE Incentives and Fuel Economy Labeling Requirements - Environmental Protection Agency - 40 CFR Part 600 10/1/1995 Reports

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC

This final rule amends the fuel economy regulations to include alternative-fueled automobiles. The Alternative Motor Fuels Act (AMFA) of 1988 includes 1993 model year and later alternative-fueled automobiles (passenger automobiles and light trucks) in the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) program on a favorable basis to encourage the manufacture of these vehicles. The AMFA provides these CAFE "credits" for automobiles designed to be fueled with methanol, ethanol, other alcohols, natural gas, or dual-fueled automobiles designed to operate on one or more of these alternative fuels and gasoline or diesel fuel. Under the AMFA, these credits are only available for automobiles that meet certain requirements regarding: alternative fuel content (e.g., for alcohol fuels, a minimum of 85 percent by volume alcohol), energy efficiency, and driving range. Neither the AMFA nor the final rule will affect automobiles that do not meet these requirements; such vehicles would not receive the favorable CAFE treatment. Alternative-fueled automobile labeling requirements are also specified in the AMFA. This final rule codifies the requirements of the AMFA in 40 CFR part 600. Recently, AMFA was amended by the Energy Policy Act of 1992, to extend the CAFE credit to automobiles designed to operate on additional types of alternative fuels. However, this final rule does not include these additional alternative fuel types, as they were not included in the CAFE program at the time the NPRM was published and the final rule was developed.

Notes: Text of final rule to be published in the Federal Register

Replacement Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle Tehnical and Policy Analysis Pursuant to Section 506 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 7/1/1997 Reports

Office of Transportation Technologies

This report is the first of two technical and policy analyses required by EPAct section 506.

Federal Alternative Motor Fuels Programs - Fourth Annual Report to Congress 7/1/1995 Reports

U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC;National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO

This annual report to Congress presents the current status of the alternative fuel vehicle programs being conducted across the country in accordance with the Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988. These programs, which represent the most comprehensive data collection effort ever undertaken on alternative fuels, are beginning their fifth year. This report summarizes tests and results from the fourth year.

Alternative Fuels In Trucking, Vol. 4, No. 2 10/1/1995 Newsletters

National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO

This issue includes articles on: 1) heavy-duty trucks accelerating the growth of the American alternative transportation fuels market and 2) the U.S. Department of Energy alternative fuel heavy-duty vehicle program.

Limited Progress in Acquiring Alternative Fuel Vehicles and Reaching Fuel Goals 2/1/2000 Reports

General Accounting Office

with the first deadline approaching for EPAct's petroleum replacement goals the GAO was asked to review progress towards achieving EPACT goals. gao was asked to determine the progress made in acquiring alternative fuel vehicles and using altnerative fuels to meeting the act's fuel replacement goals. Also, GAO determined the impediments to using alternative fuel vehicles and the measures that can be taken to address those impediments in order to reach the act's replacement goals.

AFDC Update: News of the Alternative Fuels Data Center (Vol. 6, No. 1) 5/1/1997 Newsletters

National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO

This issue includes articles on: 1) EPA's redesign of conversion certification policies; 2) the introduction of an NGV incentive Bill in Congress; 3) the introduction of the Boxer Bill in Congress; 4) New Jersey transit's expanded refueling infrastructure; 5) a Sacramento group's efforts to increase awareness of EV benefits; 6) testing of hybrid electric buses by a New York R&D group; 7) the use of heavy-duty LNG vehicles at the L.A. Airport and USPS; 8) the introduction of a medium-duty NGV by DOE and USPS; 9) NGVC's council to support LNG; 10) EV charging sites in Arizona; 11) a fuel company's purchase of natural gas refueling stations; 12) the reduced cost of methanol in California; 13) heavy-duty alternatives from OEMs and rebuilders; 14) Chrysler's announcement of an E-85 minivan and gasoline-powered fuel cell; 15) Ford's provision of 15 E85 minivans for use in state and USPS fleets; 16) GM's announcement of CNG options in Sierra and C-Series pickup trucks; 17) DOE funding; 18) a Virginia company's CNG helicopters; 19) Clean Cities' addition of the first two Ohio cities; 20) the future of CNG in Philadelphia; and 21) the Clean Cities conference.

Alternative Fuel News, Volume 1 Issue 1 10/1/1997 Newsletters

National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO

This premiere issue of Alt Fuel News is the new joint publication of AFDC Update and Clean Cities Drive. It contains articles on: 1) Clean Cities Stakeholders' Conference and Expo; 2) Clinton Enodrses STronger Clean Air Rules; 3) DOE Offers Alternative Fuel Grants; 4) Chrysler Announces Plans for E85 Minivan Production; 5) Interview with Federico Pena

Alternative Fuel News, Volume 3 Issue 1 5/1/1999 Newsletters

National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO

Issue Volume 3, No. 1 of the Alternative Fuel Newsletter focuses on the new millenium: what's in store for alternative fuels and advanced technology vehicles. A feature article highlights how national parks in the U.S. are working to reduce pollution by using alternative fuels within the parks.

Heavy-Duty Truck Demonstration with a 400-HP DDC Series 60G LNG Engine, and Support for the Downtown Los Angeles LNG Station 6/9/2000 Reports

ARCADIS Geraghty & Miller, Inc. 555 Clyde Avenue, Mountain View, CA 94043

The Trucking industry has taken an active interest in the use of engines powered by liquefied natural gas (LNG) to reduce NOx and PM emissions. However, major barriers exist to widespread use of LNG in trucking applications, including reduced performance and higher initial capital costs compared to diesel-fueled vehicles, as well as a limited fueling infrastructure. To help address these barriers, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, joined with the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD)to contract with a team led by the San Jose Transportation Technology Group of ARCADIS Geraghty & Miller. The focus of the contract was to upgrade a Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) Series 60G (S60G) engine for increased power and torque, and demonstrate this engine in an LNG-fueled semi-tractor.

Comparison of CNG and LNG Technologies for Transportation Applications: Final Subcontract Report, June 1991 - December 1991 Sinor, J. E. 1/1/1992 Reports

J. E. Sinor Consultants, Niwot, CO; National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO

This report provides a head-to-head comparison of compressed natural gas (CNG) and liquefied natural gas (LNG) supplied to heavy-duty vehicles. The comparison includes an assessment of the overall efficiency of the fuel delivery system, the cost of the fuel supply system, the efficiency of use in heavy-duty vehicles, and the environmental impact of each technology. The report concludes that there are applications in which CNG will have the advantage, and applications in which LNG will be preferred.

Alternative Fuel Transit Buses: Final Results from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Vehicle Evaluation Program Motta, R.;Norton, P.;Kelly, K.;Chandler, K.;Schumacher, L.;Clark, N. 10/1/1996 Reports

National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO;Battelle, Columbus, OH;Univ. of Missouri;West Virginia Univ.

Transit buses represent one of the best applications for alternative fuels, which have already made significant inroads into the transit bus market. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory, with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, initiated a program to study the performance, reliability, costs, and emissions of alternative fuel transit buses versus conventional diesel buses (controls). This report comprehensively and objectively evaluates the reliability, operating costs, and emissions levels of all alternative fuels currently in use in the transit bus industry.

Clean Cities Drive, Vol. 4, No. 1 5/1/1997 Newsletters

National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO

This issue includes articles on: 1) the Clean Cities Stakeholders' Conference and Expo; 2) Clean Cities corridors; 3) Raley's Supermarket's addition of a fueling station and LNG trucks to their fleet; 4) EV Market Launch workshops in New York, Richmond, Boston, and Atlanta; 5) DOE's comments on a proposed private and municipal fleet ruling; 6) new Clean Cities; 7) Dan Deaton; 8) a Clean Cities regional meeting that focused on corridors; and 9) a calendar of events.

Alternative Fuels In Trucking, Vol. 6, No. 2 11/1/1997 Newsletters

National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO

This issue includes articles on Future Fuels for Heavy-Duty Trucks, LNG Tax Relief, the Status of the Federal Clean Fuel Fleet Program, and the Cummins Engine, which successfully meets EPA and CARB standards.

A Guide to the Emissions Certification Procedures for Alternative Fuel Aftermarket Conversions 1/30/1998 Reports

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC

Emissions certification is still relatively new to the aftermarket vehicle conversion industry. Many in the industry think that as soon as a vehicle is converted to operate on compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), it automatically runs as clean as or cleaner than it did on the conventional fuel. However, recent studies have shown that aftemarket conversions may not always reduce emissions. To achieve emissions benefits, the conversion equipment must be designed and calibrated specifically for the engine and emissions control system on which it has been installed, and the installation and setup must be performed so as to not adversely affect the vehicle's original emissions performance. The reason for certification, then, is to ensure that these criteria are met, that the vehicle continues to perform properly, and that it continues to satisfy all appropriate emissions standards throughout its useful life.

Emissions from Trucks and Buses Powered by Cummins L-10 Natural Gas Engines Clark, N.;Lyons, D.;Rapp, B.;Gautam, M.;Wang, W.;Norton, P.;White, C.;Chandler, K. 5/4/1998 Reports

SAE International

Both field research and certification data show that the lean burn natural gas powered spark ignition engines offer particulate matter (PM) reduction with respect to equivalent diesel power plants. Concerns over PM inventory make these engines attractive despite the loss of fuel economy associated with throttled operation. Early versions of the Cummins L-10 natural gas engines employed a mixer to establish air/fuel ratio. Emissions measurements by the West Virginia University Transportable Heavy Duty Emissions Testing Laboratories on Cummins L-10 powered transit buses revealed the potential to offer low emissions of PM and oxides of nitrogen, (NOx) but variations in the mixture could cause emissions of NOx, carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons to rise. This was readily corrected through mixer repair or readjustment. Newer versions of the L-10 engines employ a more sophisticated fueling scheme with feedback control from a wide range oxygen sensor. Comparative testing using the 5-mile route was performed in Sacramento, California on Class 8 tractors powered by these L-10 engines, operating on liquefied natural gas (LNG) and similar tractors with M-11 diesel engines. Also, using the CBD cycle, a fleet of Cummins L-10 compressed natural gas (CNG) powered buses in Garden City (Long Island), New York, was compared to a diesel-powered fleet in Cincinnati, Ohio. Data confirms the average low production of NOx and PM, but three higher NOx emitters were found in the Long Island fleet. Energy equivalent fuel consumption for the Sacramento trucks was 29% higher for LNG than diesel, based on carbon content of the vehicle emissions, while for the new buses the CNG fuel consumption was higher by 28%.

Alternative Fuels in Public Transit: A Match Made on the Road 3/1/2002 Brochures & Fact Sheets

National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado

As alternative fuels compete with conventional fuels for a place in public awareness and acceptance, one of their most visible applications is in public transportation. Vehicles, particularly buses and shuttles, that carry people in large numbers, stand to gain much from using alternative fuels. Such high-demand fuel users can help sustain a fueling infrastructure that supports private autos and other smaller vehicles.

Alternative Fuels In Trucking, Vol. 4, No. 3 1/1/1996 Newsletters

National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO

This issue includes articles on: 1) a debate over the LNG tax rate ruling; 2) incentives for clean HD engines; 3) LNG demonstration programs; 4) Cummins announcement of a new natural gas engine.

Alternative Fuels In Trucking, Vol. 4, No. 4 2/1/1996 Newsletters

National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO

This issue includes articles on: 1) New Natural Gas powered Trucks Available in 1996; 2) Truck Standards in the Works; 3) Cummins Announces New Natural Gas Engine; 4) LNG Pavilion to Travel the Nation; 5) Weight Limits Challenge LNG Adoption

Raley's LNG Truck Fleet Start-Up Experience Alternative Fuel Truck Evaluation Project Norton, P. 10/1/1997 Reports

National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO

This report highlights the start-up experience of the project's first demonstration site, the Raley's Distribution Center in Sacramento, California. The Alternative Motor Fuel Act of 1988 requires the U.S. DOE to demonstrate and evaluate alternative fuels usage in the U.S.

A Full Fuel Cycle Analysis of Energy and Emissions Impacts of Transportation Fuels Produced from Natural Gas Wang, M.;Huang, H. 12/1/1999 Reports

Argonne National Laboratory

Because of its abundance and because it offers significant energy and envirnomental advantages, natural gas has been promoted for use in motor vehicles. A number of transportation fuels are produced from natural gas: each is distinct in terms of upstream production activities and vehicle usage. In this study, researchers evaluated eight fuels produced from natural gas - compressed natural gas, liquefied natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, hydrogen, dimethyl ether, Fischer-Tropsch diesel, and electricity - for use in five types of motor vehicles - spark-ignition vehicles, compression-ignition vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, battery-powered electric vehicles, and fuel-cell vehicles. Because of great uncertainties associated with advances in both fuel production and vehicle technologies, near-term and long-term fuels and vehicle technologies were evaluated separately. The study reveals that, in general, the use of petroleum-based fuels reduces energy use and emissions relative to use of petroleum-based gasoline and diesel fuel, although different natural gas-based fuels in different vehicle technologies can have significantly different energy and emissions impacts.

Notes: This document is available on the Argonne National Laboratory Transportation Technology Research and Development Center Web Site - http://www.transportation.anl.gov/ttrdc/pdfs/TA/13.pdf

Alternative Fuels In Trucking, Vol. 5, No. 1 8/1/1996 Newsletters

National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO

This issue includes articles on: 1) industry and education experts working together to establish alternative fuel vehicle (AFV) technician training standards; 2) developing liquefied natural gas (LNG) refuse trucks; 3) breaking down the barriers to alternative fuels; 4) the I-35 Corridor Coalition's support of LNG; 5) the Midwest Ethanol Demonstration Project; and 6) Detroit Diesel's development of a propane engine.

Alternative Fuels In Trucking, Vol. 6, No. 3 3/1/1998 Newsletters

National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO

This issue includes articles on 1) Ethanol Fuel Demosntration in Hennepin County, Minnesota 2) EPA Revises Tampering Policy for Conversions 3) Evolution of the ATA's Alternative Fuels Task Force 4) John Deere Introduces Two new natural Gas Engines 5) Alternative Fuel Taxes Reduced in Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997 6) EPA Reference Guide to Emissions Standards

Airport-based Alternative Fuel Vehicle Fleets 2/1/2001 Brochures & Fact Sheets

U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC

Airport-based Alternative Fuel Vehicle Fleets describes why the Airport 'niche market' is uniquely suited for the use of alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles. Learn why ground support equipment and landside vehicles make such good candidates for alternative fuel use and how airports such as Denver International, LAX, and Boston's Logan have been successful in implementing AFVs.

Alternative Fuels In Trucking, Vol. 6, No. 4 6/1/1998 Newsletters

National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO

This issue includes articles on 1) Cummins' Heavy-Duty Propane Engine Receives 1999 EPA CFFV LEV Certification

Waste Management LNG Truck Fleet - Start-Up Experience Norton, P. 8/1/1999 Reports

National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO

This report highlights the start-up experience of Waste Management's truck fleet.

Development of a Throttleless Natural Gas Engine Kubesh, J. 2/1/2002 Reports

Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, Texas

The primary focus of the project was to investigate methods to increase the efficiency of natural gas engines, especially under part-load conditions. This report contains details on the development of a natural gas-fueled engine capable of throttleless operation to improve part load efficiency. In-cylinder fuel-air charge stratification was pursued as the mechanism for throttleless operation. Various methods of charge stratification were investigated, including direct injection, stratified charge (DISC) and a fuel injected prechamber (FIPC). The FIPC combustion system was found to be a more practical solution to the problem of charge stratification. Performance and emissions results from this engine configuration are presented and comparisons are made between current natural gas engines and the prototype FIPC engine.

Raley's LNG Truck Fleet Final Results, Alternative Fuel Truck Evaluation Project Norton, P. 5/1/2000 Reports

National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO

This report highlights the final results of the project's first demonstration site, the Raley's Distribution Center in Sacramento, California. The Alternative Motor Fuel Act of 1988 requires the U.S. DOE to demonstrate and evaluate alternative fuels usage in the U.S.

Waste Management LNG Truck Fleet Alternative Fuel Truck Evaluation Project: Final Results Norton, P.;Chandler, K.;Clark, N. 1/1/2001 Reports

National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO

Waste Management, Inc. a private company based in Houston, Texas, began operating a fleet of heavy-duty refuse trucks powered by liquefied natural gas (LNG) at it Washington, Pennsylvania facility in 1997. Waste Management currently operates seven LNG refuse trucks at that site. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies sponsored a research project to collect and analyze data on the performance and operation costs of five Waste Management's LNG trucks in commercial service, for comparison with data on the performance of three diesel trucks operating on similar routes. This report presents an evaluation of five of the first seven LNG trucks produced by Mack. Mack partnered with Waste Management in Washington, Pennsylvania, to field test its natural gas engine design and gain experience.

Alternative Fuels In Trucking, Vol. 6, No. 1 8/1/1997 Newsletters

National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO

This issue includes articles on: 1) lessons learned from the biodiesel fuel test; 2) a grocery chain's use of LNG tractors on California roads; 3) using liquefied natural gas as a vehicle fuel; and 4) an LE-55 natural gas engine project which targets 55% efficiency and low emissions.

Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle Program Fact Sheet 5/1/2002 Brochures & Fact Sheets

National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado

Members of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are working to develop advanced, commercially viable, medium- and heavy-duty NGVs. The primary objective of the program is to develop two new NGVs for commercial servicea medium-duty (Class 3-6) compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicle and a heavy-duty (Class 7-8) liquefied natural gas (LNG) vehicle by 2004.

State Alternative Fuel Vehicle Incentives: A Decade and More of Lessons Learned Brown, M.;Breckenridge, L. 2/1/2001 Reports

National Conference of State Legislatures

This report assesses the effectiveness of state incentives and suggests incentives that might encourage new vehicle technologies. It does not assess whether a state should promote alternative fuel vehicles or whether such vehicles are the most effective means to reduce air pollution. Rather, the analysis analyzes the effectiveness of state incentives of the past decade and describes the characteristics of effective alternative fuel vehicle incentives and the fiscal implications for a state that is committed to support an effective alternative fuel vehicle program.

Alternative Fuels In Trucking, Vol. 5, No. 3 1/1/1997 Newsletters

National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO

This issue includes articles on: 1) natural gas vehicles; 2) liquefied natural gas use in the Airgas, Inc. heavy-duty truck fleet; 3) the learning curve in LNG alternative fuel trucks; and 4) Christine Ervin's speech at the 14th National Natural Gas Vehicle Conference in Dallas, Texas.

Alternative Fuels In Trucking, Vol. 5, No. 4 6/1/1997 Newsletters

National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO

Transit Users Group Supports Transit Agencies with Natural Gas Buses 4/1/2002 Brochures & Fact Sheets

National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado

This fact sheet describes the Natural Gas Transit Users Group (TUG), an organization made up of representatives from transit agencies, industry associations, and government entities, that promotes natural gas vehicle technology in transit fleets.

City of Los Angeles Bureau of Sanitation LNG Heavy-Duty Trucks 2/1/2004 Brochures & Fact Sheets

National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado

This fact sheet describes an Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) field study for Dual-Fuel? liquefied natural gas (LNG) refuse trucks used by the City of Los Angeles Bureau of Sanitation. The study showed that the trucks with Dual-Fuel engines were best suited to meet the operational requirements of refuse collection. Specifically, the Dual-Fuel trucks had adequate horsepower and torque and could be operated safely over all terrains covered by the Bureau's refuse collection service.

Waste Management LNG Truck Fleet Final Data Report 8/1/2000 Reports

United States Department of Energy

Waste Management, Inc., based in Houston, Texas, is the largest waste management service company in North America. This report addresses activities at one of Waste Management's facilities in Washington, Pennsylvania, south of Pittsburgh. This site has been operating seven heavy duty LNG refuse trucks (Mack trucks with E7G engines) with the first LNG truck starting operation in August 1997. The following document describes the results of data collection and evaluation of five of the seven heavy-duty LNG refuse trucks compared to three similar heavy-duty diesel refuse trucks operating in the Washington, Pennsylvania area.

Natural Gas in Transit Fleets: A Review of the Transit Experience Eudy, L. 2/1/2002 Reports

National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado

Use of natural gas in transit bus fleets has grown over the last decade. Often motivated by air quality concerns, the use of natural gas also contributes to national and local energy security. Approximately 9 percent of the U.S. transit fleet in 2001 was composed of buses operating on some form of natural gas and even more were on order. While some agencies have achieved success with their natural gas programs, others report difficulties and some have suspended their natural gas use altogether. What makes an agency successful in implementing natural gas into their operations? This pager reviews the experience of agencies with natural gas to determine the answer and to provide guidance on how fleets can effectively duplicate the successes and address or avoid the challenges.

Alternative Fuel Transit Buses DART's LNG Bus Fleet: Final Data Report 6/1/2000 Reports

United States Department of Energy

This report includes data collection and evaluation of Dallas Area Rapid Transit or DART's LNG bus project as part of the US Department of Energy (DOE)/National Renewable Energy Laboratory Alternative Fuel Transit Bus Evaluation Project.

Alternative Fuel Transit Buses DART's LNG Bus Fleet: Final Results 10/1/2000 Reports

National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado

This report includes the final results and evaluation of Dallas Area Rapid Transit or DART's LNG bus project as part of the US Department of Energy (DOE)/National Renewable Energy Laboratory Alternative Fuel Transit Bus Evaluation Project.

Natural Gas Transit Users Group: Assisting Transit Agencies with Natural Gas Bus Technologies 4/1/2005 Brochures & Fact Sheets

National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Golden, Colorado

Transit buses are a key niche market for natural gas vehicles. Increasingly, transit agencies have been choosing natural gas buses as a way to cut air pollution and boost energy security. The Natural Gas Transit Users Group provides information and assistance to transit agencies that are operating or considering acquisition of natural gas transit buses. It is anticipated that this will lead to increased use of natural gas buses, resulting in reduced U.S. petroleum consumption.

Mack LNG Vehicle Development 1/1/2000 Reports

Southwest Research Institute

The goal of this project was to install a production-ready state-of-the-art engine control system on the Mack E7G natural gas engine to improve efficiency and lower exhaust emissions. In addition, the power rating was increased from 300 brake horsepower (bhp) to 325 bhp. The emissions targets were oxides of nitrogen plus nonmethane hydrocarbons of less than 2.5 g/bhp-hr and particulate matter of less than 0.05 g/bhp-hr on 99 percent methane. Vehicle durability and field testing were also conducted. Further development of this engine should include efficiency improvements and oxides of nitrogen reductions.

Norcal Prototype LNG Truck Fleet: Final Data Report Chandler, K.; Proc, K. 2/1/2005 Reports

Battelle. Columbus, Ohio; National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Golden, Colorado

<p>This final data report provides detailed data and analyses related to the report <a href=http://www.afdc.energy.gov/afdc/pdfs/35427.pdf>Norcal Prototype LNG Truck Fleet: Final Results</a>, published in July of 2004. It should be used in conjunction with the descriptions, analysis, and conclusions presented in the above-referenced final report to give a complete picture of the evaluation. The detailed data and analyses are divided into four sections:</p><ul><li><b>Vehicle Systems Descriptions:</b> This section lists the trucks involved in the Norcal evaluation and gives detailed descriptions of the equipment included in the LNG trucks.</li> <li><b>Vehicle Use by Study Group:</b> This section provides a detailed summary of truck use for each of the three truck study groups (LNG, new diesel, and old diesel); these detailed data support the data in the final report, Figure 10 (page 13).</li> <li><b>Fuel Consumption and Fuel Economy:</b> This section provides monthly summaries of fuel consumption and fuel economy by truck and by group for each of the three truck study groups (LNG, new diesel, and old diesel).</li> <li><b>Maintenance Summary:</b> This section provides monthly summaries of maintenance costs by truck and by group for each of two study groups (LNG and new diesel); maintenance costs were not studied for the old diesel trucks.</li></ul>

Federal Tax Incentives Encourage Alternative Fuel Use 5/1/2008 Brochures & Fact Sheets

National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado

The U.S. government provides several tax incentives for purchasing alternative fuel, hybrid electric, and fuel cell vehicles; installing alternative fueling infrastructure; and producing, selling, or using alternative fuels. The IRS has defined alternative fuels as liquefied petroleum gas (LPG); compressed natural gas (CNG); liquefied natural gas (LNG); liquefied hydrogen; liquid fuel derived from coal through the Fischer-Tropsch process; liquid hydrocarbons derived from biomass including ethanol, biodiesel, and renewable diesel; and P-series fuels. Current federal tax incentives are outlined in this fact sheet.

Advanced Technology Vehicles in Service: NORCAL Waste Systems, Inc. White, H. 12/1/2002 Brochures & Fact Sheets

National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado

This fact sheet describes the liquefied natural gas (LNG) long-haul heavy-duty trucks at Norcal Waste Systems Inc.'s sanitary fill company.

Resource Guide for Heavy-Duty LNG Vehicles, Infrastructure, and Support Operations Chandler, K.L.; Gifford, M.T.; Carpenter, B.S. 3/1/2002 Reports

Battelle, Columbus Ohio

This Guide is designed to assist decision makers and fleet managers, in considering the use of liquefied natural gas (LNG) in heavy-duty vehicles. The objective of the Guide is to answer questions regarding implementation of LNG fuel in the fleet, e.g., getting started, likely costs, benefits, and lessons others have learned. This Guide also provides you with contact information for representatives of companies now using these fuels, manufacturers and suppliers of the fuels, and technical and governmental reference materials. The information in the Guide is intended to be useful for both new and existing end-users of heavy-duty LNG vehicles, so that operations can be initiated or conducted in a cost-effective manner with minimal disruptions related to the new fuel technology.

Norcal Prototype LNG Truck Fleet: Final Results Chandler, K.; Proc, K. 7/1/2004 Reports

Battelle, Columbus, Ohio; National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado

This report summarizes the results of the prototype liquefied natural gas (LNG) truck evaluation at Norcal.

Transit on the Cutting Edge of Clean Technology 9/1/2012 Reports

American Public Transportation Association, Washington, DC

This white paper reviews the substantial progress that transit agencies have made in investing in innovative clean technologies and fuels, such as electricity, hybrid vehicles, electric storage, biofuels, natural gas, and hydrogen fuel cells.

Clean Cities 2011 Annual Metrics Report Johnson, C. 12/1/2012 Reports

National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado

This annual report details the petroleum savings and vehicle emissions reductions achieved by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program in 2011. The report also details other performance metrics, including the number of stakeholders in Clean Cities coalitions, outreach activities by coalitions and national laboratories, and alternative fuel vehicles deployed.

U.S. and Canadian Natural Gas Vehicle Market Analysis 2/25/2013 Reports

TIAX LLC, Cupertino, California

With the primary objective of identifying the most productive and effective means to increase the use of natural gas vehicles (NGVs) in the U.S. and Canada, the TIAX team has conducted a thorough and independent assessment of the NGV market. To highlight the major opportunities to spur the market's development and expansion, this assessment examines the key technical, economic, regulatory, social, and political drivers and challenges that shape this market. Discussed in this report are: Comparative and Scenario Analysis; Natural Gas Vehicle Industry Overview; Market Segmentation; Heavy-Duty Vehicle Ownership and Production; Light- and Medium-Duty Vehicle Ownership and Production; and Liquefied Natural Gas Infrastructure. This assessment was sponsored by: America's Natural Gas Alliance with the support of participating American Gas Association companies.

Clean Cities 2012 Annual Metrics Report Johnson, C. 12/5/2013 Reports

National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Clean Cities program advances the nation's economic, environmental, and energy security by supporting local actions to cut petroleum use in transportation. A national network of nearly 100 Clean Cities coalitions brings together stakeholders in the public and private sectors to deploy alternative and renewable fuels, idle-reduction measures, fuel economy improvements, and new transportation technologies, as they emerge.</p><p>Each year DOE asks Clean Cities coordinators to submit annual reports of their activities and accomplishments for the previous calendar year. Data and information are submitted via an online database that is maintained as part of the Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Coordinators submit a range of data that characterizes the membership, funding, projects, and activities of their coalitions. They also submit data about sales of alternative fuels, deployment of alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), idle-reduction initiatives, fuel economy activities, and programs to reduce vehicle miles traveled (VMT). NREL analyzes the data and translates them into petroleum-use reduction impacts, which are summarized in this report.

2014 Future of Fuels: An Analysis of Government Projections through 2040 2/7/2014 Reports

NACS, Alexandria, Virginia

This report is an evaluation of the U.S. Energy Information Administration's Annual Energy Outlook 2014.

Notes: This publication is copyrighted by the NACS and is accessed at http://www.nacsonline.com.

Franklin County Sanitary Landfill - Landfill Gas (LFG) to Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) - Project 1/1/2005 Reports

Edwards and Kelcey. Morristown, New Jersey

This report examines the Franklin County, Ohio project to convert landfill gas (LFG) to liquefied natural gas (LNG) for use by alternative fuel vehicles in Central Ohio Clean Fuels Coalition (COCFC) fleets.

Case Study - Liquefied Natural Gas 6/1/2013 Brochures & Fact Sheets

Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois

As a part of the U.S. Department of Energy's broad effort to develop cleaner transportation technologies that reduce U.S. dependence on imported oil, this study examines advanced 2011 natural gas fueled trucks using liquefied natural gas (LNG) replacing older diesel fueled trucks. The trucks are used 6 days per week in regional city-to-landfill long hauls of incinerator waste with two fills per day. This is a workable fit for the limited range LNG trucks. Reduction of fuel costs and harmful emissions relative to the replaced trucks are significant.