U.S. Transit Buses by Fuel Type

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012** 2013 2014 2015
Diesel 52068.702000000005 46687.212 44669.248 43585 42727.88 41275.949499999995 38514.8 40010 36102
CNG, LNG & Blends 10178.844 12303.61 11864.256 12320 12515.568 13070.153 13190 11939 16416
Electric & Hybrid 1500.7269999999999 2527.228 3176.768 4637 5921.344 7449.31 8705.4 12721 12294
Gasoline 391.494 332.53000000000003 453.824 464 538.304 643.3495 725.45 711 781
Biodiesel* 0 4389.396000000001 4149.2480000000005 5100 5315.752 5045.214500000001 4616.5 5472 5401
Other 1109.2330000000002 266.024 518.6560000000001 132 269.152 237.0235 197.85 213 142
Source: American Public Transportation Association Fact Book Derived from Table 21 and 34 in Appendix A of Edition 2016.
Notes: Biodiesel was counted in the "other" category until 2008. Current numbers do not indicate methodology for defining what blend qualifies a bus as biodiesel and discretion is advised in the use of these numbers beyond basic trend analyses.

**2012 vehicle power source percentages were not available from the Public Transportation Fact Book, so an average of 2011 and 2013 power source percentages in combination with the number of transit buses in 2012 is used in place of the missing values. "Other" includes propane, bio/soy fuel, biodiesel (in 2007), hydrogen, methanol, ethanol and various blends. Bus totals go back to 1926 in Table 17 of Appendix A of 2011 Public Transportation Fact Book (url listed above). Available at www.afdc.energy.gov/data/

This chart depicts the number of transit buses in use in the United States, categorized by fuel type, from 2007 to 2015. In all years shown, diesel buses represent the largest portion of total buses, with natural gas buses a distant second. Electric and hybrid buses are the fastest growing fuel type as they have increased more than 8 times from 2007 to 2015. The increase in both natural gas buses and electric and hybrid buses is largely due to the favorable economics and clean air benefits in the transit bus applications.