Publications

Find publications about alternative transportation, including alternative fuels, advanced vehicles, and regulated fleets.

Search Results | 80 publications
Title Author Date Category
Clean Cities 2015 Annual Metrics Report Johnson, C.; Singer, M. 12/28/2016 Reports

National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Clean Cities program advances the nation's economic, environmental, and energy security by supporting local actions to cut petroleum use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in transportation. A national network of nearly 100 Clean Cities coalitions, whose territory covers 80% of the U.S. population, brings together stakeholders in the public and private sectors to deploy alternative and renewable fuels, idle-reduction (IR) measures, fuel economy improvements, and new transportation technologies as they emerge. Each year, DOE asks Clean Cities coordinators to submit annual reports of their activities and accomplishments for the previous calendar year. Progress reports and information are submitted online as a function of the Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Coordinators report a range of information that characterizes the membership, funding, projects, and activities of their coalitions. They also document activities in their region related to the development of refueling/charging infrastructure, sales of alternative fuels; deployment of alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs), plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs), hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs); idle reduction initiatives; fuel economy improvement activities; and programs to reduce vehicle miles traveled (VMT). NREL analyzes the data and translates them into petroleum-use and GHG emission reduction impacts, which are summarized in this report.

Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 35 Davis, S.C.; Williams, S.E.; Boundy, R.G. 11/1/2016 Books & Chapters

Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Roltek, Inc., Clinton, Tennessee

The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 35 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office. Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the Data Book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs.

Frequently Asked Questions About the EPAct State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleet Program 10/1/2016 Brochures & Fact Sheets

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office, Washington, DC

Electric Vehicles as Distributed Energy Resources Fitzgerald, G.; Nelder, C.; and Newcomb, J. 6/15/2016 Reports

Rocky Mountain Institute, Boulder, Colorado

Several key forces are combining to accelerate the pace of EV adoption, such as customer interest, increased scale of production, and availability of charging infrastructure. This report focuses on the changing incentives and emerging technological options that are shifting the way utilities and other grid operators perceive EV charging opportunities. Together, these two sets of forces are creating new opportunities and increased scale for smart EV-charging solutions. It also covers the important questions that emerge for regulators, policymakers, and utilities.

Notes:

This copyrighted publication can be accessed on the Rocky Mountain Institute's website.

Renewable Fuel Standard Program: Standards for 2014, 2015, and 2016 and Biomass-Based Diesel Volume for 2017; Final Rule 2/12/2016 Brochures & Fact Sheets

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, D.C.

Under section 211 of the Clean Air Act, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is required to set renewable fuel percentage standards every year. This action establishes the annual percentage standards for cellulosic biofuel, biomass-based diesel, advanced biofuel, and total renewable fuel that apply to all motor vehicle gasoline and diesel produced or imported in the years 2014, 2015, and 2016. The EPA is establishing a cellulosic biofuel volume for all three years that is below the applicable volume specified in the Act, and is also rescinding the cellulosic biofuel standard for 2011. Relying on statutory waiver authorities, the EPA is adjusting the applicable volumes of advanced biofuel and total renewable fuel for all three years. The 2016 standards are expected to spur further progress in overcoming current constraints in renewable fuel distribution infrastructure, which in turn is expected to lead to substantial growth over time in the production and use of renewable fuels. In this action, EPA is also establishing the applicable volume of biomass-based diesel for 2017. Finally, EPA is setting the compliance and attest reporting deadlines for the years 2013, 2014, and 2015, as well as finalizing regulatory amendments to clarify the scope of the existing algal biofuel pathway. This final rule is effective on February 12, 2016.

Clean Cities 2014 Annual Metrics Report Johnson, C.; Singer, M. 12/22/2015 Reports

National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado

Each year, the U.S. Department of Energy asks its Clean Cities program coordinators to submit annual reports of their activities and accomplishments for the previous calendar year. Data and information are submitted via an online database that is maintained as part of the Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Coordinators submit a range of data that characterize the membership, funding, projects, and activities of their coalitions. They also submit data about sales of alternative fuels, deployment of alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), idle-reduction (IR) initiatives, fuel economy activities, and programs to reduce vehicle miles traveled (VMT). NREL analyzes the data and translates them into petroleum-use reduction impacts, which are summarized in this 2014 Annual Metrics Report.

High-Octane Mid-Level Ethanol Blend Market Assessment Johnson, C.; Newes, E.; Brooker, A.; McCormick, R.; Peterson, S.; Leiby, P.; Martinez, R.U.; Oladosu, G.; Brown, M.L. 12/16/2015 Reports

National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden Colorado; Lexidyne, LLC, Colorado Springs, Colorado; Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

For years, the United States government has been promoting increased use of biofuels, including ethanol from non-food feedstocks. However, the country has reached the ethanol blend wall, where more ethanol is produced domestically than can be blended into standard gasoline.</p><p>This report evaluates the various paths toward adoption of high-octane ethanol blends in the United States. Modeling indicates the potential for a robust market and the study's findings prioritize barriers and propose associated solutions.

Costs Associated With Non-Residential Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment 11/30/2015 Reports

New West Technologies, LLC, Englewood, Colorado

As more drivers purchase plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs), there is a growing need for a network of electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) to provide power to those vehicles. PEV drivers will primarily charge their vehicles using residential EVSE, but there is also a need for non-residential EVSE in workplace, public, and fleet settings. This report provides information about the costs associated with purchasing, installing, and owning non-residential EVSE.

Motor Fuel Excise Taxes 9/1/2015 Brochures & Fact Sheets

National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden Colorado

A new report from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) explores the role of alternative fuels and energy efficient vehicles in motor fuel taxes. Throughout the United States, it is common practice for federal, state, and local governments to tax motor fuels on a per gallon basis to fund construction and maintenance of our transportation infrastructure. In recent years, however, expenses have outpaced revenues creating substantial funding shortfalls that have required supplemental funding sources. While rising infrastructure costs and the decreasing purchasing power of the gas tax are significant factors contributing to the shortfall, the increased use of alternative fuels and more stringent fuel economy standards are also exacerbating revenue shortfalls. The current dynamic places vehicle efficiency and petroleum use reduction polices at direct odds with policies promoting robust transportation infrastructure. Understanding the energy, transportation, and environmental tradeoffs of motor fuel tax policies can be complicated, but recent experiences at the state level are helping policymakers align their energy and environmental priorities with highway funding requirements.

Primer on Motor Fuel Excise Taxes and the Role of Alternative Fuels and Energy Efficient Vehicles Schroeder, A 8/24/2015 Reports

National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden Colorado

Motor fuel taxes were established to finance our nation's transportation infrastructure, yet evolving economic, political, and technological influences are constraining this ability. At the federal level, the Highway Trust Fund (HTF), which is primarily funded by motor fuel taxes, has become increasingly dependent on general fund contributions and short-term reauthorizations to prevent insolvency. As a result, there are discussions at both the federal and state levels in which stakeholders are examining the future of motor fuel excise taxes as well as the role of electric and alternative fuel vehicles in that future.</p><p>This report intends to provide an overview of motor fuel taxation, review its specific relationship to alternative fuel use and vehicle efficiency, and outline approaches that a number of states have taken to address these issues. The specific focus is on motor fuels used in over-the-road transportation, which accounted for approximately 82% of all energy used for transportation in the United States in 2014 (EIA 2015a). The report primarily provides context around federal fuel tax rules and rates, but analogies can be drawn to individual state programs.

Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Commercial Lawn Equipment (Spanish Version) 6/9/2015 Brochures & Fact Sheets

National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401

The U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program produced this guide to help inform the commercial mowing industry about product options and potential benefits. This guide provides information about equipment powered by propane, ethanol, compressed natural gas, biodiesel, and electricity, as well as advanced engine technology. In addition to providing an overview for organizations considering alternative fuel lawn equipment, this guide may also be helpful for organizations that want to consider using additional alternative fueled equipment.

Accelerating the Development and Deployment of Advanced Technology Vehicles, including Battery Electric and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles 2/1/2015 Brochures & Fact Sheets

Department of Energy, Washington, D.C.

This fact sheet, a summary or the proposed changes to tax credits for the production of advanced technology vehicles, is from the US Department of the Treasury's General Explanations of the Administrations Fiscal Year 2016 Revenue Proposals. The proposal would replace the credit for plug-in electric drive motor vehicles with a credit for advanced technology vehicles. The credit would be available for a vehicle that meets the following criteria: (1) the vehicle operates primarily on an alternative to petroleum; (2) as of January 1, 2014, there are few vehicles in operation in the U.S. using the same technology as such vehicle; and (3) the technology used by the vehicle exceeds the footprint based target miles per gallon by at least 25 percent.

Supporting the Plug-In Electric Vehicle Market: Best Practices from State PEV Programs Powers, C. 1/14/2015 Reports

Georgetown Climate Center, Washington DC

This paper captures best practices in state-sponsored plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) buyer incentive programs, DC fast charging programs, and PEV awareness initiatives, as presented at the Transportation and Climate Initiative's 2014 Plug-In Electric Vehicle Workshop.

Notes: This copyrighted publication is available on the Georgetown Climate Center website

Geography of Existing and Potential Alternative Fuel Markets in the United States Johnson, C.; Hettinger, D. 11/3/2014 Reports

National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado

When deploying alternative fuels, it is paramount to match the right fuel with the right location, in accordance with local market conditions. We used six market indicators to evaluate the existing and potential regional market health for each of the five most commonly deployed alternative fuels: electricity (used by plug-in electric vehicles), biodiesel (blends of B20 and higher), E85 ethanol, compressed natural gas (CNG), and propane. Each market indicator was mapped, combined, and evaluated by industry experts. This process revealed the weight the market indicators should be given, with the proximity of fueling stations being the most important indicator, followed by alternative fuel vehicle density, gasoline prices, state incentives, nearby resources, and finally, environmental benefit. Though markets vary among states, no state received 'weak' potential for all five fuels, indicating that all states have an opportunity to use at least one alternative fuel. California, Illinois, Indiana, Pennsylvania, and Washington appear to have the best potential markets for alternative fuels in general, with each sporting strong markets for four of the fuels. Wyoming showed the least potential, with weak markets for all alternative fuels except for CNG, for which it has a patchy market. Of all the fuels, CNG is promising in the greatest number of states--largely because freight traffic provides potential demand for many far-reaching corridor markets and because the sources of CNG are so widespread geographically.

Clean Cities 2013 Annual Metrics Report Johnson, C.; Singer, M. 10/20/2014 Reports

National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado

Each year, the U.S. Department of Energy asks its Clean Cities program coordinators to submit annual reports of their activities and accomplishments for the previous calendar year. Data and information are submitted via an online database that is maintained as part of the Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Coordinators submit a range of data that characterize the membership, funding, projects, and activities of their coalitions. They also submit data about sales of alternative fuels, deployment of alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), idle-reduction (IR) initiatives, fuel economy activities, and programs to reduce vehicle miles traveled (VMT). NREL analyzes the data and translates them into petroleum-use reduction impacts, which are summarized in this 2013 Annual Metrics Report.

Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Commercial Lawn Equipment 10/10/2014 Brochures & Fact Sheets

National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401

The U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program produced this guide to help inform the commercial mowing industry about product options and potential benefits. This guide provides information about equipment powered by propane, ethanol, compressed natural gas, biodiesel, and electricity, as well as advanced engine technology. In addition to providing an overview for organizations considering alternative fuel lawn equipment, this guide may also be helpful for organizations that want to consider using additional alternative fueled equipment.

Zero Emission MAP; the Effect of Monetary Incentives on Sales of Advanced Clean Cars in the United States: Summary of the Evidence Collantes, G.; Eggert, A. 9/1/2014 Reports

University of California, Davis, Davis, California

This is a summary document of studies indicating there is strong evidence that monetary incentives, if properly designed and communicated, are effective in supporting the early sales of advanced clean cars.

Reliable Temperature Compensation is Critical to CNG Vehicle Safety 8/18/2014 Technology Bulletins

Clean Vehicle Education Foundation, Acworth, Georgia

This Technical Bulletin addresses the potential hazards created by failure of compressed natural gas (CNG) dispensers that do not accurately compensate for the temperature of the natural gas in vehicle storage containers as they are filled and the history of serious incidents as a result. Fueling requirements are included.

Alternative Fuels: A State Policy Analysis Skinner, A.; Rego, J. 7/24/2014 Reports

Clean Energy Coalition, Ann Arbor, Michigan

State policy directed towards alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) varies greatly between states. Clean Energy Coalition conducted this research with the goal of gaining a better understanding of this policy patchwork, and the relationship between different types of policy and the number of AFVs per capita in each state. Disseminating this information to policymakers is a key step in the promotion of alternative fuels and AFVs because it can guide decision makers toward more effective policy.

EPAct State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleet Compliance Methods 3/25/2014 Brochures & Fact Sheets

National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado

Fact sheet outlines the state and alternative fuel provider fleet compliance options. Under Standard Compliance, covered fleets must acquire a certain percentage of AFVs each year based on the number of light-duty vehicles they purchase. Alternative Compliance allows covered fleets to obtain a waiver from Standard Compliance to implement petroleum reduction measures in their vehicle fleets in lieu of the AFV acquisition requirements.

State Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Laws and Incentives: 2013 Year in Review 1/10/2014 Technology Bulletins

Over the last year, state legislatures and agencies have been busy creating incentives, laws, and regulations that support the use of alternative fuels, advanced vehicles, and other strategies that align with Clean Cities' mission to cut petroleum use in transportation.

Clean Cities 2012 Annual Metrics Report Johnson, C. 12/5/2013 Reports

National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Clean Cities program advances the nation's economic, environmental, and energy security by supporting local actions to cut petroleum use in transportation. A national network of nearly 100 Clean Cities coalitions brings together stakeholders in the public and private sectors to deploy alternative and renewable fuels, idle-reduction measures, fuel economy improvements, and new transportation technologies, as they emerge.</p><p>Each year DOE asks Clean Cities coordinators to submit annual reports of their activities and accomplishments for the previous calendar year. Data and information are submitted via an online database that is maintained as part of the Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Coordinators submit a range of data that characterizes the membership, funding, projects, and activities of their coalitions. They also submit data about sales of alternative fuels, deployment of alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), idle-reduction initiatives, fuel economy activities, and programs to reduce vehicle miles traveled (VMT). NREL analyzes the data and translates them into petroleum-use reduction impacts, which are summarized in this report.

States Enact Natural Gas Vehicle and Infrastructure Incentives 10/23/2013 Technology Bulletins

During the first part of 2013, several states enacted legislation pertaining to natural gas vehicles (NGVs) and natural gas infrastructure development.

A Tale of Renewed Cities; A Policy Guide on How to Transform Cities by Improving Energy Efficiency in Urban Transport Systems 7/9/2013 Reports

International Energy Agency, Paris, France

This report is part of the IEA Policy Pathway series and highlights lessons learned and examples of good practice from countries with experience implementing a wide range of measures to improve energy efficiency in urban transport systems.

Notes: This publication is copyrighted by the International Energy Agency and is accessed at www.iea.org.

Plug-in Electric Vehicles: Challenges and Opportunities Khan, S., Kushler, M. 6/12/2013 Reports

American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, Washington, DC

This report discusses the challenges facing widespread adoption of PEVs from both transportation and utility sector perspectives. It explains the importance of addressing those challenges and presents recommendations to achieve that end.

Notes: This copyrighted document can be downloaded from the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy website.

Alternative Fuels Data Center 6/1/2013 Brochures & Fact Sheets

National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Fact sheet describes the Alternative Fuels Data Center, which provides information, data, and tools to help fleets and other transportation decision makers find ways to reduce petroleum consumption through the use of alternative and renewable fuels, advanced vehicles, and other fuel-saving measures.

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Non-Cost Barriers to Consumer Adoption of New Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies Stephens, T. 3/1/2013 Reports

Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois

Consumer preferences are key to the adoption of new vehicle technologies. Barriers to consumer adoption include price and other obstacles, such as limited driving range and charging infrastructure; unfamiliarity with the technology and uncertainty about direct benefits; limited makes and models with the technology; reputation or perception of the technology; standardization issues; and regulations. For each of these non-cost barriers, this report estimates an effective cost and summarizes underlying influences on consumer preferences, approximate magnitude and relative severity, and assesses potential actions, based on a comprehensive literature review. While the report concludes that non-cost barriers are significant, effective cost and potential market share are very uncertain. Policies and programs including opportunities for drivers to test drive advanced vehicles, general public outreach and information programs, incentives for providing charging and fueling infrastructure, and development of technology standards were examined for their ability to address barriers, but little quantitative data exists on the effectiveness of these measures. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Vehicle Technology Deployment Pathways: An Examination of Timing and Investment Constraints Plotkin, S.; Stephens, T.; McManus, W. 3/1/2013 Reports

Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois and Oakland University School of Business, Rochester, Michigan

Scenarios of new vehicle technology deployment serve various purposes; some will seek to establish plausibility. This report proposes two reality checks for scenarios: (1) implications of manufacturing constraints on timing of vehicle deployment and (2) investment decisions required to bring new vehicle technologies to market. An estimated timeline of 12 to more than 22 years from initial market introduction to saturation is supported by historical examples and based on the product development process. Researchers also consider the series of investment decisions to develop and build the vehicles and their associated fueling infrastructure. A proposed decision tree analysis structure could be used to systematically examine investors' decisions and the potential outcomes, including consideration of cash flow and return on investment. This method requires data or assumptions about capital cost, variable cost, revenue, timing, and probability of success/failure, and would result in a detailed consideration of the value proposition of large investments and long lead times. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Freight Transportation Modal Shares: Scenarios for a Low-Carbon Future Brogan, J. J.; Aeppli, A. E.; Beagan, D. F.; Brown, A.; Fischer, M. J.; Grenzeback, L. R.; McKenzie, E.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Vyas, A. D.; Witzke, E. 3/1/2013 Reports

Cambridge Systematics, Cambridge, Massachusetts and Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois

Truck, rail, water, air, and pipeline modes each serve a distinct share of the freight transportation market. The current allocation of freight by mode is the product of technologic, economic, and regulatory frameworks, and a variety of factors -- price, speed, reliability, accessibility, visibility, security, and safety -- influence mode. Based on a comprehensive literature review, this report considers how analytical methods can be used to project future modal shares and offers insights on federal policy decisions with the potential to prompt shifts to energy-efficient, low-emission modes. There are substantial opportunities to reduce the energy used for freight transportation, but it will be difficult to shift large volumes from one mode to another without imposing considerable additional costs on businesses and consumers. This report explores federal government actions that could help trigger the shifts in modal shares needed to reduce energy consumption and emissions. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Effects of Travel Reduction and Efficient Driving on Transportation: Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; DeFlorio, J.; McKenzie, E.; Tao, W.; Vimmerstedt, L. 3/1/2013 Reports

Cambridge Systematics, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Since the 1970s, numerous transportation strategies have been formulated to change the behavior of drivers or travelers by reducing trips, shifting travel to more efficient modes, or improving the efficiency of existing modes. This report summarizes findings documented in existing literature to identify strategies with the greatest potential impact. The estimated effects of implementing the most significant and aggressive individual driver behavior modification strategies range from less than 1% to a few percent reduction in transportation energy use and GHG emissions. Combined strategies result in reductions of 7% to 15% by 2030. Pricing, ridesharing, eco-driving, and speed limit reduction/enforcement strategies are widely judged to have the greatest estimated potential effect, but lack the widespread public acceptance needed to accomplish maximum results. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Effects of the Built Environment on Transportation: Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Other Factors Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; Dunphy, R. T.; Vimmerstedt, L. 3/1/2013 Reports

Cambridge Systematics, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Planning initiatives in many regions and communities aim to reduce transportation energy use, decrease emissions, and achieve related environmental benefits by changing land use. This report reviews and summarizes findings from existing literature on the relationship between the built environment and transportation energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, identifying results trends as well as potential future actions. The indirect influence of federal transportation and housing policies, as well as the direct impact of municipal regulation on land use are examined for their effect on transportation patterns and energy use. Special attention is given to the 'four D' factors of density, diversity, design and accessibility. The report concludes that policy-driven changes to the built environment could reduce transportation energy and GHG emissions from less than 1% to as much as 10% by 2050, the equivalent of 16%-18% of present-day urban light-duty-vehicle travel. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

U.S. and Canadian Natural Gas Vehicle Market Analysis 2/25/2013 Reports

TIAX LLC, Cupertino, California

With the primary objective of identifying the most productive and effective means to increase the use of natural gas vehicles (NGVs) in the U.S. and Canada, the TIAX team has conducted a thorough and independent assessment of the NGV market. To highlight the major opportunities to spur the market's development and expansion, this assessment examines the key technical, economic, regulatory, social, and political drivers and challenges that shape this market. Discussed in this report are: Comparative and Scenario Analysis; Natural Gas Vehicle Industry Overview; Market Segmentation; Heavy-Duty Vehicle Ownership and Production; Light- and Medium-Duty Vehicle Ownership and Production; and Liquefied Natural Gas Infrastructure. This assessment was sponsored by: America's Natural Gas Alliance with the support of participating American Gas Association companies.

Clean Cities 2011 Annual Metrics Report Johnson, C. 12/1/2012 Reports

National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado

This annual report details the petroleum savings and vehicle emissions reductions achieved by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program in 2011. The report also details other performance metrics, including the number of stakeholders in Clean Cities coalitions, outreach activities by coalitions and national laboratories, and alternative fuel vehicles deployed.

Fighting Oil Addiction: Ranking States' Gasoline Price Vulnerability and Solutions For Change Grossman, D.; Lovaas, D. 11/1/2012 Reports

David Gardiner & Associates, LLC, Arlington, Virginia; Natural Resources Defense Council, New York, New York

This is the sixth edition of this report, updating the 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, and 2011 research by David Gardiner & Associates (DGA) and the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) identifying the states whose citizens feel the greatest economic pain from gasoline prices--and the states that are doing the most to break their addiction to oil.

Notes: This copyrighted publication is available on the Natural Resources Defense Council's website.

Clean Cities 2010 Annual Metrics Report Johnson, C. 10/1/2012 Reports

National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado

Each year, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) asks Clean Cities coordinators to submit an annual report of their activities and accomplishments for the previous calendar year. Data and information are submitted to an online database that is maintained as part of the Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (AFDC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Coordinators submit a range of data that characterizes the membership, funding, projects, and activities of their coalitions. They also submit data about sales of alternative fuels, deployment of alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), idle reduction initiatives, fuel economy activities, and programs to reduce vehicle miles traveled (VMT). NREL analyzes the data and translates them into gasoline use reduction impacts, which are summarized in this report.

Plug-In Electric Vehicle Deployment in the Northeast; A Market Overview and Literature Review Zhu, C.; Nigro, N. 9/1/2012 Reports

Center for Climate and Energy Solutions; Arlington, Virginia

Electric vehicles have the potential to decrease our nation's dependence on oil and drastically reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. In an effort to stimulate economic growth, decrease the United States' dependence on oil, and lessen the operating cost of personal transportation, the federal government issued a final rule in 2012 requiring new cars to average 54.5 miles per gallon by 2025. This goal is ambitious and will be difficult to accomplish without significant numbers of alternative fuel vehicles. Several alternative fuels are currently available, but electric vehicles (EVs) are emerging as the predominant alternative for passenger vehicles. While EVs are hitting the market and offer numerous advantages, such as zero tailpipe emissions, lower fuel costs, and the convenience of filling up at home, a number of barriers stand in the way of wide-scale EV deployment.</p><p>This literature review, prepared by the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions, provides an overview of plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) deployment in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic states. The report assesses current electric vehicle and electric vehicle charging station technology, looks at the state of PEV markets, reviews the benefits of PEV deployment, and identifies the barriers and challenges to PEVs in gaining market acceptance. The literature review is intended to serve as a resource for consumers and policy makers who seek to better understand the nature of electric vehicle deployment in this region and related challenges.

Experiences with Compressed Natural Gas in Colorado Vehicle Fleets; Case Study Analysis 8/1/2012 Reports

Colorado Energy Office, Denver, Colorado; Researched and assembled by the Antares Group, Inc.

This series of case studies is the product of in-person and telephone interviews with three Colorado fleet managers who use compressed natural gas (CNG) as a vehicle fuel and interviews with other CNG stakeholders. The fleets were selected using criteria that are intended to increase the usefulness of the overall product, including geographic diversity, length of CNG experience, diversity of vehicles, and ownership model. The case studies are based on a framework constructed with broad stakeholder input, designed to provide detailed information on fleet manager experiences with CNG vehicles and fueling infrastructure.</p><p>Featured fleets include the following: Republic Services (Republic), a private sector waste and environmental management firm with a CNG fleet based in the Denver metro area; Denver International Airport (DIA), an airport with more than 15 years of experience with CNG and proven success as a CNG hub; and City of Grand Junction, a Western Slope municipality with a public/private partnership to provide public CNG fueling.

California Plug-In Electric Vehicle Owner Survey 8/1/2012 Reports

California Center for Sustainable Energy & California Air Resources Board

In the first half of 2012, the California Center for Sustainable Energy (CCSE), in coordination with the California Air Resources Board (ARB), conducted the largest plug-in electric vehicle owner survey in the state's history. Reaching out to more than 2,500 California plug-in electric vehicle owners, CCSE received data from 1,419 unique respondents who provided information on vehicle use, charging behavior, access to public and residential charging infrastructure, fueling costs and household demographics. The data collected by CCSE, in support of the state's Clean Vehicle Rebate Project highlights California's commitment to promoting clean transportation solutions that improve urban air quality, reduce greenhouse gas emissions and offer the state's consumers viable alternatives to conventional gasoline vehicles. The results of the statewide CCSE and ARB survey confirm the early market success as well as the considerable consumer and environmental benefits of electrified vehicles.

EPA Announces Final Rulemaking for Clean Alternative Fuel Vehicle and Engine Conversions 8/1/2012 Brochures & Fact Sheets

Office of Transportation and Air Quality, Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, D.C.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is adopting changes to the regulations found in 40 CFR part 85 subpart F for clean alternative fuel conversion manufacturers. This action affects regulations applicable to manufacturers of light-duty vehicle and heavy-duty highway vehicle and engine clean alternative fuel conversion systems. The revisions will streamline the compliance process while maintaining environmentally protective controls.

What is FuelEconomy.gov? 7/1/2012 Brochures & Fact Sheets

U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, D.C.; Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

FuelEconomy.gov is an Internet resource that helps consumers make informed fuel economy choices when purchasing a vehicle and achieve the best fuel economy possible from the cars they own.</p><p>FuelEconomy.gov is maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy with data provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The site helps fulfill DOE and EPA's responsibility under the Energy Policy Act of 1992 to provide accurate miles per gallon (MPG) information to consumers.

Annual Energy Outlook 2012; with Projections to 2035 6/1/2012 Reports

U.S. Energy Information Administration

The projections in the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (AEO2012) focus on the factors that shape the U.S. energy system over the long term. Under the assumption that current laws and regulations remain unchanged throughout the projections, the AEO2012 Reference case provides the basis for examination and discussion of energy production, consumption, technology, and market trends and the direction they may take in the future. It also serves as a starting point for analysis of potential changes in energy policies. But AEO2012 is not limited to the Reference case. It also includes 29 alternative cases (see Appendix E, Table E1), which explore important areas of uncertainty for markets, technologies, and policies in the U.S. energy economy. Many of the implications of the alternative cases are discussed in the "Issues in focus" section of this report.</p><p>Key results highlighted in AEO2012 include continued modest growth in demand for energy over the next 25 years and increased domestic crude oil and natural gas production, largely driven by rising production from tight oil and shale resources. As a result, U.S. reliance on imported oil is reduced; domestic production of natural gas exceeds consumption, allowing for net exports; a growing share of U.S. electric power generation is met with natural gas and renewables; and energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level from 2010 to 2035, even in the absence of new Federal policies designed to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

Electric Vehicle Policies, Fleet, and Infrastructure: Synthesis Lindquist, K.; Lindquist, K.; Wendt, M. 11/1/2011 Reports

Washington State Department of Transportation, Olympia, Washington

Transportation Synthesis Reports (TSRs) are brief summaries of currently available information on topics of interest to WSDOT staff. Online and print sources may include newspaper and periodical articles, NCHRP and other TRB programs, AASHTO, the research and practices of other state DOTs and related academic and industry research. Internet hyperlinks in the TSRs are active at the time of publication, but host server changes can make them obsolete.

Advancing Renewable Energy 5/1/2011 Brochures & Fact Sheets

U.S. Department of Agriculture

This brochure provides an overview of USDA's energy related programs and how USDA collaboration efforts are making a measurable impact in the world of renewable energy.

Clean Alternative Fuel Vehicle and Engine Conversions; Final Rule 4/8/2011 Reports

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, D.C.

EPA is streamlining the process by which manufacturers of clean alternative fuel conversion systems may demonstrate compliance with vehicle and engine emissions requirements. Specifically, EPA is revising the regulatory criteria for gaining an exemption from the Clean Air Act prohibition against tamperingfor the conversion of vehicles and engines to operate on a clean alternativefuel. This final rule creates additional compliance options beyond certification that protect manufacturers of clean alternative fuel conversion systems against a tampering violation, depending on the age of the vehicle orengine to be converted. The new options alleviate some economic and proceduralimpediments to clean alternative fuel conversions while maintainingenvironmental safeguards to ensure that acceptable emission levels from converted vehicles are sustained.

Issues Affecting Adoption of Natural Gas Fuel in Light- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Whyatt, GA 9/1/2010 Reports

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington

This report provides a preliminary examination of the incentives and barriers for adopting natural gas as the fuel for light-duty passenger cars, heavy-duty combination trucks, and fleet vehicles of all types.

Electric Vehicle Infrastructure: A Guide for Local Governments in Washington State Technical Advisory Committee 7/1/2010 Reports

Washington State Department of Commerce, Olympia, Washington; Puget Sound Regional Council, Seattle, Washington

In 2009 the Washington State Legislature enacted a new law designed to encourage electric vehicles. To create a consistent regulatory framework that would help this industry grow across Washington State, the legislature required the Puget Sound Regional Council and Department of Commerce to develop guidance for local governments. To meet this requirement, a broad-based technical advisory committee made up of local governments, charging equipment vendors, utilities, ports, state agencies, and consumer interests was formed. The state's new electric vehicle law requires that all local governments in Washington State allow electric vehicle charging stations in most of their zoning categories. Allowing charging stations creates the need to address a number of issues beyond zoning. These include on-street and off-street signage, charging station design standards, parking enforcement, accessibility for all users, SEPA exemptions, and more. These issues are addressed in this document.

EPA Finalizes Regulations for the National Renewable Fuel Standard Program for 2010 and Beyond 2/1/2010 Brochures & Fact Sheets

Office of Transportation and Air Quality, Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, D.C.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is finalizing revisions to the National Renewable Fuel Standard program (commonly known as the RFS program). This rule makes changes to the Renewable Fuel Standard program as required by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA). The revised statutory requirements establish new specific annual volume standards for cellulosic biofuel, biomass-based diesel, advanced biofuel, and total renewable fuel that must be used in transportation fuel. The revised statutory requirements also include new definitions and criteria for both renewable fuels and the feedstocks used to produce them, including new greenhouse gas (GHG) emission thresholds as determined by lifecycle analysis. The regulatory requirements for RFS will apply to domestic and foreign producers and importers of renewable fuel used in the U.S.

Executive Order 13514: Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance Barack Obama 10/5/2009 Reports

White House, Washington, D.C.

In order to create a clean energy economy that willincrease our Nation?s prosperity, promote energy security, protect the interests of taxpayers, and safeguard the health of our environment, the Federal Government must lead by example. It is therefore the policy of the United States that Federal agencies shall increase energy efficiency; measure, report, and reduce their greenhouse gas emissions from direct and indirect activities; conserve and protect water resources through efficiency, reuse, andstormwater management; eliminate waste, recycle, and prevent pollution;leverage agency acquisitions to foster markets for sustainable technologiesand environmentally preferable materials, products, and services; design,construct, maintain, and operate high performance sustainable buildingsin sustainable locations; strengthen the vitality and livability of the communities in which Federal facilities are located; and inform Federal employees about and involve them in the achievement of these goals.

Environmental Laws Applicable to Construction and Operation of Biodiesel Production Facilities 11/1/2008 Books & Chapters

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, D.C.

This document discusses the various federal environmental requirements that may apply to commercial biodiesel production facilities located in Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, or Nebraska that use the transesterification process. It also provides information on specific environmental laws including the Clean Water Act, the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the Renewable Fuel Standard, and the Clean Air Act. Note that state or local requirements may be more stringent than federal requirements and are outside the scope of this document.

Federal Tax Incentives Encourage Alternative Fuel Use 5/1/2008 Brochures & Fact Sheets

National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado

The U.S. government provides several tax incentives for purchasing alternative fuel, hybrid electric, and fuel cell vehicles; installing alternative fueling infrastructure; and producing, selling, or using alternative fuels. The IRS has defined alternative fuels as liquefied petroleum gas (LPG); compressed natural gas (CNG); liquefied natural gas (LNG); liquefied hydrogen; liquid fuel derived from coal through the Fischer-Tropsch process; liquid hydrocarbons derived from biomass including ethanol, biodiesel, and renewable diesel; and P-series fuels. Current federal tax incentives are outlined in this fact sheet.

Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 12/19/2007 Reports

U.S. Congress, Washington, D.C.

The Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 put into law many of the provisions of Executive Order 13423. The goal of the EISA law is to move the United States toward greater energy independence and security, to increase production of clean renewable fuels, to protect consumers, to increase the efficiency of products, buildings, and vehicles, to promote research on and deploy greenhouse gas capture and storage options, and to improve the energy performance of the Federal Government.

Executive Order 13423: Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management Bush, G.W. 1/24/2007 Reports

White House, Washington, D.C.

Executive Order 13423, titled Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management, makes it policy that Federal agencies conduct their transportation, and energy-related activities under the law in an environmentally, economically, and fiscally sound manner. Specifically regarding transportation, "ensure that, if the agency operates a fleet of at least 20 motor vehicles, the agency, relative to agency baselines for fiscal year 2005, (i) reduces the fleet's total consumption of petroleum products by 2 percent annually through the end of fiscal year 2015; (ii) increases the total fuel consumption that is non-petroleum-based by 10 percent annually; and (iii) uses plug-in hybrid (PIH) vehicles when PIH vehicles are commercially available at a cost reasonably comparable on the basis of life-cycle cost to non-PIH vehicles."

Notes: Executive Order 13423 specifically revokes E.O. 13101; E.O. 13123; E.O. 13134; E.O. 13148; and E.O. 13149.

The Energy Policy Act of 2005: What the Energy Bill Means to You 4/6/2006

U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, D.C.

The Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT), signed by President Bush on August 8, 2005, offers consumers and businesses federal tax credits beginning in January 2006 for purchasing fuel-efficient hybrid-electric vehicles and energy-efficient appliances and products. Most of these tax credits remain in effect through 2007. Buying and driving a fuel-efficient vehicle and purchasing and installing energy-efficient appliances and products provide many benefits such as better gas mileage, meaning lower gasoline costs, fewer emissions, lower energy bills, increased indoor comfort, and reduced air pollution. Some consumers will also be eligible for utility or state rebates, as well as state tax incentives for energy-efficient homes, vehicles and equipment.

Credit for New Qualified Alternative Motor Vehicles (Advanced Lean Burn Technology Motor Vehicles and Qualified Hybrid Motor Vehicles) 1/13/2006 Journal Articles & Abstracts

Internal Revenue Service, Washington, D.C.

<p>On January 13, 2006, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) issued guidance regarding the tax credits for light-duty (less than 8,500 lbs. GVWR) lean-burn and hybrid electric vehicles. The guidance establishes the procedures that manufacturers must use to certify that their vehicles qualify for the tax credit. The IRS plans to issue additional guidance at a later date to address procedures for qualifying alternative fuel vehicles, fuel cell vehicles, and heavy-duty hybrid vehicles.</p><p>The guidance provides procedures whereby a manufacturer may certify to the IRS that its vehicles qualify for the tax credits enacted in EPAct 2005. The guidance also provides procedures for reporting on the total number of qualifying vehicles that have been sold. Upon receiving the required information, the IRS will issue an acknowledgement. A manufacturer that has submitted the proper certification and received an acknowledgement from the IRS may then certify to customers/puchasers that the vehicles qualify for tax credits. For taxpayers to claim the credit, they must place the vehicle in service after December 31, 2005. The taxpayer also must be the original user of the vehicle (first purchaser or lessee) and the vehicle must be predominately used in the U.S.</p>

Alternative Fuel Driver Training Companion Manual 9/1/2005 Reports

National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Golden, Colorado

In the summer of 2004, EPAct and Clean Cities worked together to develop a course to teach trainers how to educate fleet drivers on the use of alternative fuels and vehicles. This manual features the information presented in the classes, including the safe use of four alternative fuels: biodiesel, compressed natural gas, (CNG), E85, (85% ethanol, 15% gasoline), and propane.

Energy Policy Act of 2005 Public Law 109-58, 109th Congress 8/8/2005 Reports

The Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) included measuring governing energy efficiency, renewable energy, oil and gas use, clean coal power, nuclear energy, and vehicles and fuels including the use of alternative fuels, hybrid vehicles, fuel cell buses, clean fuel school buses, automobile efficiency, and diesel emissions reduction.

Clean Air Act of 1990 as amended through 2003 2/24/2004 Reports

Clean Air Act of 1990 with amendments through January 2004

Executive Order 13149 William J. Clinton 4/1/2000 Reports

U.S. Government

Executive Order 13149 was issued by President of the United States of America William J. Clinton on April 21, 2000, to ensure that the Federal Government exercised leadership in the reduction of petroleum consumption through improvements in fleet fuel efficiency and the use of alternative fuel vehicles and alternative fuels. EO 13149 revoked EO 13031.

Notes: EO 13149 revoked EO 13031. EO 13149 was revoked by EO 13423.

Limited Progress in Acquiring Alternative Fuel Vehicles and Reaching Fuel Goals 2/1/2000 Reports

General Accounting Office

with the first deadline approaching for EPAct's petroleum replacement goals the GAO was asked to review progress towards achieving EPACT goals. gao was asked to determine the progress made in acquiring alternative fuel vehicles and using altnerative fuels to meeting the act's fuel replacement goals. Also, GAO determined the impediments to using alternative fuel vehicles and the measures that can be taken to address those impediments in order to reach the act's replacement goals.

Perspectives on AFVs: State and City Government Fleet Manager Survey 2/1/1999 Reports

National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO

In an effort to reduce national dependence on imported oil and to improve urban air quality, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is promoting the development and deployment of alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). To support this activity, DOE has directed the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop and conduct projects to evaluate the performance and acceptability of light-duty AFVs compared to similar gasoline vehicles. As part of this effort, NREL has undertaken a number of evaluation projects, including conducting telephone surveys with fleet managers and drivers of AFVs in the federal fleet. This report summarizes the results of the survey of state and city government fleet managers.

Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Real-World Perspectives from the Federal Fleet Whalen, P 7/1/1998 Reports

National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO

Vehicles that run onfuels other than gasoline, or "alternative fuel" vehicles (AFVs), offer great promise for improving air quality and lessening our nation's dependence on imported oil. But if they are to fulfill this promise and replace traditional gasoline vehicles on a large scale, they must meed the needs of the people using them, and consumers must have access to"real-world" information about them. Do they drive as well as gasoline vehicles? Are their refueling stations as convenient as the corner gas station? Can we expect the same reliability that we've come to expect from our gasoline vehicles? How better to answer these questions than to ask the people who are actually running the AFVs? So in 1996, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national labortory, designed a nationwide study to capture the opinions of federal fleet managers and drivers onthe performance, reliability, driveability, and acceptability of AFVs. NREL put together this short brochure to serve as a "quick look" summaryof the surveys and their results.

Alternative Fuels In Trucking, Vol. 6, No. 4 6/1/1998 Newsletters

National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO

This issue includes articles on 1) Cummins' Heavy-Duty Propane Engine Receives 1999 EPA CFFV LEV Certification

Revision to Addendum to Mobile Source Enforcement Memorandum 1A 6/1/1998 Reports

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC

The purpose of this document is to revise the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Addendum to Mobile Source Enforcement Memorandum 1A policy for motor vehicles and motor vehicle engines originally designed to operate on gasoline or diesel fuel and subsequently modified to operate exclusively or in conjunction with compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquefied petroleum gas (LPG or propane).

Alternative Fuels In Trucking, Vol. 6, No. 3 3/1/1998 Newsletters

National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO

This issue includes articles on 1) Ethanol Fuel Demosntration in Hennepin County, Minnesota 2) EPA Revises Tampering Policy for Conversions 3) Evolution of the ATA's Alternative Fuels Task Force 4) John Deere Introduces Two new natural Gas Engines 5) Alternative Fuel Taxes Reduced in Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997 6) EPA Reference Guide to Emissions Standards

Perspectives on AFVs: 1996 Federal Fleet Driver Survey 9/15/1997 Reports

National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO

In an effort to reduce national dependence on imported oil and to improve urban air quality, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is promoting the development and deployment of alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). To support this activity, DOE has directed the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop and conduct projects to evaluate the performance and acceptability of light-duty AFVs compared to similar gasoline vehicles. As part of this effort, NREL has undertaken a number of evaluation projects, including conducting telephone surveys with fleet managers and drivers of AFVs in the federal fleet. This report summarizes the results of the survey of fleet managers.

Addendum to Mobile Source Enforcement Memorandum 1A 9/4/1997 Reports

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC

The purpose of this document is to clarify and revise the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) "tampering" enforcement policy for motor vehicles and motor vehicle engines originally designed to operate on gasoline or diesel fuel and subsequently modified to operate exclusively or in conjunction with compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquefied petroleum gas (LPG or propane).

Perspectives on AFVs: 1996 Federal Fleet Manager Survey 7/1/1997 Reports

National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO

In an effort to reduce national dependence on imported oil and to improve urban air quality, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is promoting the development and deployment of alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). To support this activity, DOE has directed the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop and conduct projects to evaluate the performance and acceptability of light-duty AFVs compared to similar gasoline vehicles. As part of this effort, NREL has undertaken a number of evaluation projects, including conducting telephone surveys with fleet managers and drivers of AFVs in the federal fleet. This report summarizes the results of the survey of fleet managers.

Replacement Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle Tehnical and Policy Analysis Pursuant to Section 506 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 7/1/1997 Reports

Office of Transportation Technologies

This report is the first of two technical and policy analyses required by EPAct section 506.

Alternative Fuels In Trucking, Vol. 5, No. 2 12/1/1996 Newsletters

National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO

This issue includes articles on: 1) the development of an interstate clean transportation corridor; 2) a Congressional task force that is addressing natural gas vehicle R&D concerns; 3) a midwest ethanol demonstration project; 4) Caterpillar's introduction of new dual-fuel engines; 5) a report on gas composition issues for natural gas vehicles and fueling stations; 6) NGVC's testimony before the House Oversight and Investigation Committee; and 7) DOE's Biodiesel Research and Development Program's search for industry partnerships in the heavy-duty sector.

Alternative Fuels In Trucking, Vol. 5, No. 1 8/1/1996 Newsletters

National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO

This issue includes articles on: 1) industry and education experts working together to establish alternative fuel vehicle (AFV) technician training standards; 2) developing liquefied natural gas (LNG) refuse trucks; 3) breaking down the barriers to alternative fuels; 4) the I-35 Corridor Coalition's support of LNG; 5) the Midwest Ethanol Demonstration Project; and 6) Detroit Diesel's development of a propane engine.

CMAQ Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program - Innovations in Transportation & Air Quality: Twelve Exemplary Projects 4/1/1996 Brochures & Fact Sheets

U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC

The Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement (CMAQ) program has been a hallmark of innovation and flexibility under the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA). By targeting transportation funding to air quality improvement, it is also unique. The CMAQ program has transferred a far greater percentage of funds to transit improvements than any other "flexible funding" program in ISTEA. In addition, the CMAQ program has created opportunities to build new partnerships in the public and private sectors. This brochure highlights several exemplary projects that received CMAQ funds. These projects provide a range of benefits in addition to improved air quality and mobility.

A Guide to the Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program 4/1/1996 Brochures & Fact Sheets

U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC

The Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement (CMAQ) program has been a hallmark of innovation and flexibility under the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA). By targeting transportation funding to air quality improvement, it is also unique. The CMAQ program has transferred a far greater percentage of funds to transit improvements than any other "flexible funding" program in ISTEA. In addition, the CMAQ program has created opportunities to build new partnerships in the public and private sectors.

Alternative Fuels In Trucking, Vol. 4, No. 4 2/1/1996 Newsletters

National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO

This issue includes articles on: 1) New Natural Gas powered Trucks Available in 1996; 2) Truck Standards in the Works; 3) Cummins Announces New Natural Gas Engine; 4) LNG Pavilion to Travel the Nation; 5) Weight Limits Challenge LNG Adoption

Alternative Fuels In Trucking, Vol. 4, No. 3 1/1/1996 Newsletters

National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO

This issue includes articles on: 1) a debate over the LNG tax rate ruling; 2) incentives for clean HD engines; 3) LNG demonstration programs; 4) Cummins announcement of a new natural gas engine.

Labeling Requirements for Alternative Fuels and Alternative Fueled Vehicles; Final Rule. Federal Trade Commission - 16 CFR Part 309. 5/19/1995 Journal Articles & Abstracts

This excerpt from the Federal Register provides regulations pertaining to labeling requirements for alternative fuels and alternative fueled vehicles.

EPACT Initiatives for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: An Integrated Approach for Implementing the Energy Policy Act 3/1/1995 Reports

U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC

The Energy Policy Act (EPACT) of 1992 gave the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) the means to expand research and development in the transportation sector and to create programs for accelerating the large-scale introduction of alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). Through these programs, DOE - together with other Federal agencies - is actively building partnerships to fortify our nation's transportation system with the fuels and technologies it will need for the future. This booklet presents background on the Energy Policy Act as it relates to transportation and an overview of DOE's integrated, five-point approach to fulfilling the EPACT mandates.

Impact of Highway Fuel Taxes on Alternative Fuel Vehicle Economics Gushee, D. E. 3/16/1994 Reports

Congressional Research Service, Washington, DC

The purpose of this report is to roughly estimate the impact on the market potential for alternative fuels of three highway tax policy options: 1) to equalize on an energy equivalency basis the tax at a level equal to gasoline; 2) to remove the tax completely from the alternatives; and 3) to equalize at an intermediate level.

Executive Order 12844 (1993) Clinton, W.J. 4/21/1993 Brochures & Fact Sheets

Office of the President of the United States, Washington, D.C.

President Clinton orders federal agencies to increase purchase of alternative fuel vehicles by 50% over requirements set forth in the Energy Policy Act of 1992.

Public Law 102-486 - October 24, 1992: Energy Policy Act of 1992 10/24/1992 Reports

This act is intended to provide for improved energy efficiency. It includes provisions for the following: energy efficiency; alternative fuels - general; alternative fuels - non-federal programs; availability and use of replacement fuels, alternative fuels, and alternative fueled private vehicles; electric motor vehicles; electricity; high-level radioactive waste; United States enrichment corporation; remedial action and uranium revitalization; uranium enrichment health, safety, and environment; renewable energy; coal; strategic petroleum reserve; octane display and disclosure; global climate change; additional federal power act provisions; oil pipeline regulatory reform; general provisions - reduction of oil vulnerability; energy and environment; energy and economic growth; policy and administrative provisions; non-federal power act hydropower provisions; coal, oil, and gas; Indian energy resources; insular areas energy security; nuclear plant licensing; and additional nuclear energy provisions.

Final Report of the Interagency Commission on Alternative Motor Fuels 9/1/1992 Reports

Interagency Commission on Alternative Motor Fuels

This final report of the Interagency Commission on Alternative Motor Fuels describes progress to date in implementing the provisions of the Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988 (AMFA; Public Law 100-494). The purpose of AMFA is to help achieve energy security, improve air quality, and encourage the production of methanol-, ethanol-, and natural-gas-powered motor vehicles by encouraging the development and widespread consumer use of methanol, ethanol, and natural gas as transportation fuels. AMFA seeks to help alternative transportation fuels reach the threshold level of commercial application and consumer acceptability at which they can successfully compete with petroleum-based transportation fuels.

Notes: Report based on studies performed by Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN; Argonne National Lab., Argonne, IL; EA Eastern Division; Carlton Enterprises