Hybrid and Plug-In Electric Vehicles

Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), and all-electric vehicles (EVs)—also called electric drive vehicles collectively—use electricity either as their primary fuel or to improve the efficiency of conventional vehicle designs.

Hybrid Electric Vehicles 

Icon of a fuel pump.

HEVs are primarily powered by an internal combustion engine that runs on conventional or alternative fuel and an electric motor that uses energy stored in a battery. The battery is charged through regenerative braking and by the internal combustion engine and is not plugged in to charge.

Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles 

Icon of a plug in an electrical outlet and a fuel pump.

PHEVs are powered by an internal combustion engine that can run on conventional or alternative fuel and an electric motor that uses energy stored in a battery. The vehicle can be plugged into an electric power source to charge the battery. Some types of PHEVs are also called extended range electric vehicles (EREVs).

All-Electric Vehicles 

Icon of a plug in an electrical outlet.

EVs use a battery to store the electric energy that powers the motor. EV batteries are charged by plugging the vehicle into an electric power source. EVs are sometimes referred to as battery electric vehicles (BEVs).


Tax Credits and Incentives

Plug-in hybrids and all-electric vehicles qualify for a $2,500 to $7,500 federal tax credit.

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